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06 August 2018 Photo Sonia Small
Karen Lazenby WomenofKovsies
Dr Karen Lazenby strives for a stronger, rule-based, and consistent governance structure.

A transformed University of the Free State (UFS) will be one that promotes social justice in everything it does, a university where its diverse people feel a sense of common purpose and engagement. The UFS is developing this through its Integrated Transformation Plan (ITP) introduced in January 2017. 

“The majority of the current systems and processes in student administration at the university are still manual. This lack of automation leads to inconsistencies and service failures,” says Dr Karen Lazenby. As Registrar for Systems and Administration, Dr Lazenby is responsible for ensuring a smooth and efficient student lifecycle across all three campuses. 

With the ITP, the Governance: Systems and Administration work stream strives to have a stronger, rule-based, and consistent governance structure with a single line of accountability in student administration across all faculties and relevant support departments on the three campuses. By ensuring this ease of use and access there will be an integrated student experience and greater empowerment of students.

“Our focus is on automation and self-services for students (such as the time-table, requests for additional and ad hoc exams and appeals), to ensure transparency and accessibility of rules and policies, decisions relating to admission, progression rules, awarding of qualifications and graduation and faculty and general rules,” Dr Lazenby said.  It will also entail the optimisation of PeopleSoftCampus (the Enterprise Resource Planning system).

“Through this automation, I would also like to get the university’s student administration to such a level that academic staff can focus their energy on teaching and research and student administration staff can focus more on quality assurance,” said Dr Lazenby.

News Archive

UFS presents colloquium on the law of delict
2008-03-06

 

The Faculty of Law at the University of the Free State (UFS) recently presented a unique debate on the law of delict on the Main Campus in Bloemfontein. The colloquium was attended by six current and two retired judges of the Supreme Court of Appeal, including Justice Craig Howie, President of the Supreme Court of Appeal, as well as two judges from the Free State provincial division. Twelve of the most prominent academics and authors on the law of delict from across the country, members of the Free State Bar, as well as staff from the faculty were present. Arguments centred on the element wrongfulness and how it should be determined as well as how it differs from fault and more specifically negligence. Unfortunately no unanimity about how judgments of the Supreme Court of Appeal on how this issue should be interpreted could be reached. Attendees however agreed that this was a useful debate that served to highlight the importance of this issue and they expressed their appreciation for the opportunity. As far as could be ascertained, this was the first time that a debate regarding the law of delict took place on this level. At the colloquium were, from the left: Prof. Johann Neethling (speaker at the colloquium and author on the law of delict, Unisa), Prof. Rita-Marié Jansen (Department of Private Law at the UFS and organiser of the colloquium), Prof. Johan Potgieter (author on the law delict, Unisa), Appeal Judge Craig Howie (President of the Supreme Court of Appeal), and Judge Mojalefa Rampai (Free State Provincial Division of the Supreme Court).
Photo: Supplied

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