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29 March 2018 Photo Pixabay
Be a law-abiding road-rule citizen these holidays
Follow the rules of the road to be safe.

Road crashes are a major cause of deaths globally, and particularly during the March-April holidays in South Africa. Therefore, abiding by the rules of the road serves to curb the high number of fatalities and is highly recommended. We urge all staff and students to take caution on the roads to ensure a safe return to the campuses next term.

According to Arrive Alive, some of the leading accident causes include drunk driving, failure to wear seatbelts, driver inexperience, driver fatigue, distracted driving and walking, as well as bravado. Be sure to avoid this at all cost.

Obeying the rules of the road saves lives. In 2016, Arrive Alive partnered with the UFS BSafe Campaign to educate students on becoming more responsible drivers, passengers, and pedestrians. For more road safety tips, visit the Arrive Alive website here.

Mawande Mateza, Human Movement Science student, has five simple tips on how to stay safe on the road these holidays – courtesy of Protection Services.

Check out the video below.

News Archive

Ancient methods used for new sculpture
2012-05-11

 

Angus Taylor sculpture “Van Hier tot Daar”
Photo: Supplied
10 May 2012

An Angus Taylor sculpture “Van Hier tot Daar” was installed at the Agricultural Building on the Bloemfontein Campus. The sculpture is a three-metre head (14 times larger than life-size) made out of stacked Marico slate. It weighs approximately 15 tons and took two weeks, after months of preparation, to be built on site. The portrait is generic as Taylor has used various people from his studio as reference.

Ms Angela de Jesus, Curator of the Johannes Stegmann Art Gallery on campus, says the process of stacking stone refers to one of the first methods used by humans to create an object or mark a place of significance in three dimensions. The sculpture speaks not only of man’s evolutionary development, but also of how humans are physically and psychologically connected and interdependent on the land. The sculpture that emerges from the ground, although monumental in scale, becomes somewhat of an anti-monument as it is non-representative and it is without a plinth.

The sculpture is the 16th artwork to be installed on the Bloemfontein Campus by the Lotto Sculpture-on-Campus Project funded by the National Lottery Distribution Trust Fund.

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