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29 March 2018 Photo Pixabay
Be a law-abiding road-rule citizen these holidays
Follow the rules of the road to be safe.

Road crashes are a major cause of deaths globally, and particularly during the March-April holidays in South Africa. Therefore, abiding by the rules of the road serves to curb the high number of fatalities and is highly recommended. We urge all staff and students to take caution on the roads to ensure a safe return to the campuses next term.

According to Arrive Alive, some of the leading accident causes include drunk driving, failure to wear seatbelts, driver inexperience, driver fatigue, distracted driving and walking, as well as bravado. Be sure to avoid this at all cost.

Obeying the rules of the road saves lives. In 2016, Arrive Alive partnered with the UFS BSafe Campaign to educate students on becoming more responsible drivers, passengers, and pedestrians. For more road safety tips, visit the Arrive Alive website here.

Mawande Mateza, Human Movement Science student, has five simple tips on how to stay safe on the road these holidays – courtesy of Protection Services.

Check out the video below.

News Archive

Students translate documents for the aged
2007-11-08

 

As part of practical module in translation, third-year students in Translation Studies at the University of the Free State (UFS) translated a document for a group of aged people. The document is a guide for luncheon clubs of Age-in-Action, a non-governmental organisation working amongst the aged. The document contains information on how the aged can organise the group and the services they can render in the community. The document was translated into Afrikaans and Sesotho with the help of a group in Heidedal and Mangaung, respectively. As part of their course, the students had to meet with the management of Age-in-Action to find out more about the aim of the document. After that, they visited the groups in the community twice to gain information that would ensure that the documents fulfil the needs of the groups. The students attended to matters such as the type of language used by the groups, what the groups do with the document and the layout requirements of the groups, e.g. a larger font. The module in translation studies is presented as a community service-learning module, which means that students learn while rendering service in a community. They have the advantage of learning in a real-life situation and the community has the advantage of receiving a service. The aim is to develop knowledge which is to the advantage of the community. On the photo the translated document is handed to the leaders of the luncheon clubs. From the left, are: Ms Melita Pietersen (luncheon club leader), me. Karma Harvey (third-year student in Language Practice at the UFS), Ms Susan van Eck (luncheon club leader), and Ms Catherine van Rooyen (luncheon club leader).
Photo: Supplied

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