Latest News Archive

Please select Category, Year, and then Month to display items
Years
2017 2018 2019 2020
Previous Archive
29 May 2019 | Story Valentino Ndaba | Photo Pexels
Prof Melanie Walker
Fostering human capabilities in universities may potentially transform education, says Prof Melanie Walker.

Education is at the centre of human life, and has the potential to be a crucial support for democratic life. Prof Melanie Walker’s recent research paper strikes a balance in dealing with people, education and the implications for democracy through the lens of human capabilities theory and practice and her own research.

People and papers

In her capacity as the SARChI Chair in the Higher Education and Human Development Research Programme at the University of the Free State (UFS), Prof Walker recently published a paper titled: Defending the Need for a Foundational Epistemic Capability in Education. It appeared in the special issue of the Journal of Human Development and Capabilities in honour of renowned Nobel Laureate Amartya Sen’s 85th birthday.

Nurturing epistemic justice

Within the context of existing literature such as that of Sen’s concern with the value of education on the one hand, and public reasoning on the other, Prof Walker argues for a foundational epistemic capability to shape the formal education landscape – as well as quality in education – by fostering inclusive public reasoning (including critical thinking) in all students. It would contribute to what Sen calls the ‘protective power of democracy’ and shared democratic rights, which, he argues, are strongly missed when most needed.

“Sen’s approach asks us to build democratic practices in our university and in our society in ways which create capabilities for everyone. If our students learn public reasoning in all sorts of spaces in university, including the pedagogical, they may carry this into and back to society,” she said.

Educating for equality

Empowering society and fighting for justice are some of the crucial contributions made possible through fostering the epistemic capability of all students. “The capability requires that each student is recognised as both a knower and teller, a receiver and a contributor in critical meaning and knowledge, and an epistemic agent in processes of learning and critical thinking,” states Prof Walker.

In a young democracy like South Africa’s, inclusive public reasoning becomes all the more essential in order to achieve equality, uphold rights and sustain democracy as enshrined in the constitution, thereby improving people’s lives. 

News Archive

A learning path for working adults
2009-02-09

 
From the left are: Ms Maquida du Preez (MDP Programme Manager), Ms Eliche Lorandi ( Marketing Executive), Mr Theo Potgieter (BEE and Transformation Manager), Ms Marie Griebenouw (Programme Manager) and Mr Danie Jacobs (Head: Centre fro Business Dynamics).
Photo: Mangaliso Radebe
 
 In the short space of five years, the Centre for Business Dynamics at the University of the Free State (UFS) has grown in stature to such an extent that it is currently offering leadership development programmes at 45 institutions all over the country.

Speaking at the fifth anniversary of the centre’s establishment, its director, Mr Danie Jacobs, said the centre was the first commercial unit in South Africa, attached to a business school, to establish a desk focusing on Black Economic Empowerment (BEE) and Transformation in association with Empowerdex.

The main purpose of this joint venture with Empowerdex is to deliver comprehensive BEE training through the development and presentation of various programmes.

The centre has also introduced the High-Performing Directors’ Programme in association with ABSA. A total of about 40 students have enrolled for this programme so far,and their numbers fluctuate every year.

It is also the first unit in the country to link up with Thinking Fusion, one of the three consultancies contracted by the UFS, to introduce two unique leadership programmes, namely a programme in Creating Leadership and Personal Capacity in Women and the Leadership in the Connection Economy programme.

“Our aim is to prepare women for full participation as managers and leaders in transforming organizations to become truly integrated and representative of the full diversity spectrum of South Africa,” Mr Jacobs said.

“We have built amazing relationships with various clients, both in the private and public sector, over the last five years,” said Mr Jacobs. “I believe the success of the Centre for Business Dynamics lies within our methodology of action learning, as well as creating a learning path for working adults.”

“Because of our country’s history not all people are on an equal footing when it comes to prior learning, so we level the playing field by breaking the training up into easily absorbable components. The centre can address the training needs of any company because of the multiple resources that we are fortunate enough to have at our fingertips,” he said.

The centre also offers a Postgraduate Diploma in Tax Strategy and Management, aimed at bringing all parties involved in the field of taxation up to date with the latest developments and changes.

In addition, the centre has introduced The Choice and The Choice at Work programme in association with the Arbinger Institute in the United States of America. There are also two management programmes, namely the Management Preparation Programme and the Management Development Programme.

Apart from these programmes, the centre also offers products and services such as short courses, workshops and consultations.

Media Release
Issued by: Mangaliso Radebe
Assistant Director: Media Liaison
Tel: 051 401 2828
Cell: 078 460 3320
E-mail: radebemt.stg@ufs.ac.za  
9 February 2009
 

We use cookies to make interactions with our websites and services easy and meaningful. To better understand how they are used, read more about the UFS cookie policy. By continuing to use this site you are giving us your consent to do this.

Accept