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24 May 2019 | Story Eloise Calitz | Photo Charl Devenish
Gangster book Discussion
From left: Jacques van Wyk from the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners (ACFE) Cathy Dlodlo, news editor from OFM; Pieter Roux from the UFS Business School; Alta Vermeulen from the UFS Department of Political Studies and Governance and Pieter-Louis Myburgh, author

A packed Odeion Auditorium at the University of the Free State was welcomed by Professor Helena van Zyl, Head of the UFS Business School. The reason being, a panel discussion with award-winning investigative reporter and author, Pieter-Louis Myburgh, on his much-publicised book Gangster State: Unravelling Ace Magashule's Web of Capture. The programme took the form of a panel discussion. The panellists included Pieter-Louis Myburgh, author; Jacques van Wyk from the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners (ACFE); Cathy Dlodlo, news editor from OFM; Alta Vermeulen from the UFS Department of Political Studies and Governance; and Pieter Roux from the UFS Business School.

In his introduction, Myburgh said he was happy that he was able to come to Bloemfontein and have the discussion, since South Africans should cherish freedom of speech and a free press.

The research for the book took 13 months to conclude, and during this time he spent a lot of time in the Free State and Bloemfontein. He mentioned that the book gave him the opportunity to present a condensed account of what he discovered; he could therefore share more, as opposed to just reporting on a story in the newspaper. For him, investigative reporting should always be fact based and open to scrutiny.

Some of the topics raised by the panel was concern about the perception that investigative journalists are focusing more on corruption in the public sector and less on the private sector. This was, however, discarded as a myth, as Myburgh pointed out that he exposed both private and public sector dealings in order to provide the full scope of involved parties.

Focusing on whistle blowers, the panel challenged the verification of whistle-blower information. Myburgh responded that journalists never use only one whistle-blower’s evidence, since that is merely the start of the investigation. Further investigation was necessary, and facts had to be verified. With that said, there is still a lot to be done with regard to the protection of whistle-blowers, he concluded.

The floor was opened to the audience, which provided the opportunity to ask questions and raise concerns about what was mentioned during the panel discussion. The audience eagerly participated in the discussion. In conclusion, Myburgh reiterated that society plays a vital role in keeping those in power to the promises they make.

After the discussion, the audience had the opportunity to have their books signed by the author.

News Archive

Right to Learn cyclists still solid on the pedals
2017-11-29


  Description: Right to Learn cyclists Tags: UFS Right to Learn, Given and Gain, Cape Town, Prof Nicky Morgan, Asive Dlanjwa, students, cycling, Qwaqwa, Bloemfontein

Asive Dlanjwa, Bloemfontein Campus SRC President, on the
morning of their departure from Bloemfontein.
Photo: Nhlanhla Modzanane


It is a new day and the Right to Learn cycling team continues to make its way to Cape Town.The team arrived at their first stop in Luckhoff on day one, after cycling for 182 kilometres in five hours and five minutes. They left Luckhoff at 05:00 in the morning on day two, heading towards Britstown via De Aar and arrived at midday. On day three, the team will rest in Britstown and will continue cycling on day four, 30 November 2017, to Victoria West for 133 kilometres via Merriman.

Looking forward to another day
Asive Dlanjwa, Bloemfontein Campus SRC President, felt confident about day two despite the strong winds that they experienced along the way. “I’m feeling strong, I actually thought after day one that I’ll be feeling a bit weak, but I just don’t know how we are going to make it in this wind,” he says. Dlanjwa and his fellow cyclists cycled for 213 kilometres to Britstown, where they ended their race for day two. 

Kovsies fully behind cycling team

The tour began on 27 November 2017 in Bloemfontein, when they were sent off by Prof Nicky Morgan, former Vice-Rector: Operations, Pura Mgolombane, Dean of Student Affairs, and their Kovsie peers. Prof Morgan encouraged the team to have a wonderful and enjoyable journey, acknowledging that the journey will not be an easy one. “I want you to know that you have the support of everyone here at the UFS,” he said.
 
Messages of support continue to pour in for the team on the UFS social media platforms. The Qwaqwa Campus SRC President, Hlalele Masopha, also sent his best wishes to his mate, saying, “I wish the President with his crew a quantity of good fortune and extremely good success.” He says, “This is for the betterment of the students and the institution.”  

There have been no reports of any injuries or medical defects incurred by the cyclists nor the supporting team who are travelling with them. The team is expected to arrive in Cape Town on 4 December 2017.  

You can make a donation as follows: 

Give-n-gain page

 

EFT transaction:
Please use the following bank details:
Bank: ABSA Bank
Account Number: 1570850721
Branch Code: 632005
Account Type: Cheque
Reference: R2L: Right to Learn
Send the proof of payment Rinda Duraan: duraanmj@ufs.ac.za

Debit order: Download the form and email it to Rinda Duraan

All donations are tax deductible in terms of South African income tax legislation.  


Related article:

27 November: Kovsies SRC President cycles to raise money for registration


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