Latest News Archive

Please select Category, Year, and then Month to display items
Years
2017 2018 2019 2020
Previous Archive
07 June 2018 Photo Supplied
Emotional safety during examinations

Mid-year exams have begun and with crunch time comes emotional upheaval. However, it is manageable and should not deter you from the end-goal of succeeding in your studies while maintaining high mental health standards.

“The exam period is a time when stress and anxiety levels are higher than usual. Stress can be positive and help you stay motivated and focused. However, too much stress can be unhelpful and can make you feel overwhelmed, confused, exhausted and edgy,” says Dr Melissa Barnaschone, Director of Student Counselling and Development at the University of the Free State (UFS).

According to Helpguide.Org: Trusted guide to mental & emotional health, “Mental and emotional health is about being happy, self-confident, self-aware, and resilient. People who are mentally healthy are able to cope with life’s challenges and recover from setbacks. But mental and emotional health requires knowledge, understanding, and effort to maintain. If your mental health isn’t as solid as you’d like it to be, here’s the good news: there are many things you can do to boost your mood, build resilience, and get more enjoyment out of life.”

For further details on topics including: Building Better Mental Health, Emotional Intelligence Toolkit, Benefits of Mindfulness, Improving Emotional Intelligence (EQ), Cultivating Happiness, visit the Help Guide. 

Dr Barnaschone has a few tips on how Kovsies can better approach academic anxiety during the examination period. Here is what she has to say:

News Archive

UFS prides itself on Pauline Gutter
2014-12-04

Pauline Gutter

Her work can be described as a visual attack of marks and colour, and the purposeful application of layering and interweaving of layers that gives the identity of continuous flux and ideological migration.  Her work highlights the ‘removal’ of the farming community from their land. A review of a recent exhibition described her themes as: “A struggle for survival prevails in the dangerous world that is projected to us in the paintings …”

Gutter is not just a top professional artist, but also a well-known brand. True to her roots, her work often mirrors a passion for the farming community. In 2013, she won the ABSA L’Atelier prize of R125 000, as well as a half year’s stay in the Cité Internationale des Arts in Paris, France. 

This art competition is South Africa’s most prestigious art competition and is held annually for artists between ages 21 and 35. This award not only ensures South Africa’s emerging artists of recognition, but also affords them the opportunity to develop their talents abroad.

The UFS is very proud of breeding this class of artist. According to Gutter, her lecturers allowed them space to work on their own identities. Her work has now moved far from simply being portraits and sculptures, it also makes an impact on those who see it.

As a student, Gutter was involved in many community projects at her residence. In 2003 she was one of the two managers of the Dithwele waste sculpture park competition, an initiative of SAB. She is a diverse artist who has worked on KYKNET productions as co-worker and assistant. Gutter also does freelance camera work.

Furthermore, Gutter was on the Mail & Guardian’s list of top 200 young South Africans, an annual list that has become the premier collection of the leaders of tomorrow – and in many cases, today. She also received the Helgaard Steyn prize and was a finalist in the Sasol New Signatures Art Competition.

We use cookies to make interactions with our websites and services easy and meaningful. To better understand how they are used, read more about the UFS cookie policy. By continuing to use this site you are giving us your consent to do this.

Accept