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07 June 2018 Photo Supplied
Emotional safety during examinations

Mid-year exams have begun and with crunch time comes emotional upheaval. However, it is manageable and should not deter you from the end-goal of succeeding in your studies while maintaining high mental health standards.

“The exam period is a time when stress and anxiety levels are higher than usual. Stress can be positive and help you stay motivated and focused. However, too much stress can be unhelpful and can make you feel overwhelmed, confused, exhausted and edgy,” says Dr Melissa Barnaschone, Director of Student Counselling and Development at the University of the Free State (UFS).

According to Helpguide.Org: Trusted guide to mental & emotional health, “Mental and emotional health is about being happy, self-confident, self-aware, and resilient. People who are mentally healthy are able to cope with life’s challenges and recover from setbacks. But mental and emotional health requires knowledge, understanding, and effort to maintain. If your mental health isn’t as solid as you’d like it to be, here’s the good news: there are many things you can do to boost your mood, build resilience, and get more enjoyment out of life.”

For further details on topics including: Building Better Mental Health, Emotional Intelligence Toolkit, Benefits of Mindfulness, Improving Emotional Intelligence (EQ), Cultivating Happiness, visit the Help Guide. 

Dr Barnaschone has a few tips on how Kovsies can better approach academic anxiety during the examination period. Here is what she has to say:

News Archive

Two OSM students selected for KZN Philharmonic Youth Concerto Festival
2016-06-13

Description: Ketumile Moleleki designs KovsieGear  Tags: Ketumile Moleleki designs KovsieGear
Kamu Magou has been an occasional
studies student in violin performance
for the last four years at the Odeion
School of Music.
Photo: Supplied
Two students from the Odeion School of Music (OSM) at the University of the Free State have been selected as soloists to be part of the KwaZulu-Natal Philharmonic Orchestra National Youth Concerto Festival.

The cellist Chris van Zyl and violinist Kamu Magou will be part of the festival taking place on 29 September 2016 in the Durban City Hall. The KZN Philharmonic presents the festival annually, with the aim of providing gifted young musicians an opportunity to rehearse and perform with a professional orchestra. The orchestra will be conducted by Lykele Temmingh.

Cricketer playing cello since age of six

Chris, who is under the tutelage of Prof Anmari van der Westhuizen from the Odeion String Quartet, is a first-year student at the OSM. He will perform Tchaikovsky’s Pezzo capriccioso, Op. 62, for cello and orchestra.

He started playing the cello at the age of six, under the tutelage of Michael Haller, a respected cello pedagogue and cellist of the then Odeion String Quartet.

Although a gifted musician, he also loves cricket, and, as a youngster, his mother had to bribe him by bowling plastic cricket balls in the lounge in exchange for five minutes of cello playing.

Violin student in residence in Amsterdam

Kamu has been studying violin under Sharon de Kock from the Odeion String Quartet, her violin lecturer at the OSM, since high school. She has been an occasional studies student in violin performance for the last four years.

Kamu, who is pursuing a BCom degree at Unisa, was in residence for a week recently at the acclaimed Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra in Amsterdam. She and the Bloemfontein double bassist, Siyolise Nyondo, were part of an initiative by the South African Youth Orchestra Foundation.

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