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19 March 2019 | Story Thabo Kessah | Photo Thabo Kessah
Thokozile Thulo
Thokozile Thulo says the UFS has changed its focus in supporting students with disabilities.

The Centre for Universal Access and Disability Support (CUADS) has recently opened a permanent office on the Qwaqwa Campus The centre aims to ensure that the University of the Free State increasingly becomes a universally accessible higher-education institution which embraces students with various disabilities.

Thokozile Thulo, CUADS Assistant Officer at Qwaqwa said: “Our focus has changed from ‘special’ accommodation for individuals to the creation of a learning environment that is welcoming and empowering to all students. Integrated learning and education methodologies and processes are being researched and developed to create more awareness among lecturing staff. This incorporates universal design, faculty instruction and curricula.” 

The CUADS office assists students to gain access to study courses, learning materials, various buildings and residences, computer facilities and specialised exams and tests. For visually-impaired students, study material and textbooks in Braille, audio, e-text or enlarged format are provided. 

The office also supports students with various psychosocial and chronic conditions such as epilepsy and panic disorder, as well as learning difficulties such as dyslexia and hyperactivity. “In addition, we support students with special arrangements such as extra time for tests and exams,” said Thokozile.



News Archive

Tim Noakes delivers lecture at UFS symposium
2014-08-04

 

Prof Tim Noakes
Photo: Renè-Jean van der Berg

The Metabolic Research Unit at the University of the Free State (UFS) held a symposium on diabetes, with Prof Tim Noakes as one of the guest speakers.

Prof Noakes, a professor in Sports Medicine at the University of Cape Town, became known mainly for his research and findings on nutrition and health and is also the person behind the infamous ‘Noakes diet’.

The ‘Noakes diet’ – or the Paleo diet – focuses on avoiding carbohydrates in favour of including high fat and oil content for a healthy diet.

During his lecture, Prof Noakes explained how this diet can actually help control certain stadia of diabetes and shared several success stories with the symposium.

Prof Noakes’ reasoning concerning the ‘traditional’ nutritional requirements known to everybody, is that it has never been studied before to determine its effectiveness.

According to this nutritional plan, often depicted as a food pyramid, carbohydrates should form the biggest part of a healthy diet and foods from the fats and oils group should be restricted.

Prof Noakes explained that the human body converts carbohydrates into glucose (sugar) to be able to digest it. It is this sugar that leads to weight and health problems in people, of which heart disease and diabetes are some of the most common. 
 

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