Course Overviews for studies in English Language and Literature

Detailed course outlines are provided in class

Undergraduate Courses


ENGL 1514: Reading Literature: An Introduction to Reading, Writing, and Critical Textual Analysis

Continuous Assessment (NQF level 5) - 16 credits

ENGL 1514 is aimed at helping students to develop the knowledge base and skills central to the analysis of literature. It offers an introduction to the history of literary production in the English language, as well as to some of the theories, terms and methods central to the discipline of English literary studies. This includes an introduction to genre as a mode of organising literary representation; the basic elements of literature such as plot, character, style, theme, setting, figures of speech, imagery, tone, rhythm and diction; local South African and African literary production; historical trends in British and global English literatures; and the role of literature as cultural texts that both shape and are shaped by history and politics. Students are introduced to a range of methods used in English literary studies, including close textual analysis; historical and cultural contextualisation; and methods of analysis derived from literary and other critical and cultural theories. They will also be trained to gather and analyse information from sources that include literary texts; critical and theoretical literatures; and cultural texts such as films, artwork and advertising. Students are encouraged to cultivate and expand these critical skills also in their communities and everyday lives, to become central agents in their own learning and to take responsibility for the process of knowledge acquisition. ENGL 1514 places a range of literary texts within their historical, cultural, national and ideological contexts, thereby enabling students to see their work as part of a larger epistemological and conceptual system.

Outcomes: After successful completion of this course, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of some of the key terms, historical movements and theories central to the field of English literary studies. Students should be able to demonstrate an awareness of how knowledge about English literature has historically been produced and continues to change as the disciplinary boundaries of the field expand in conversation with knowledge production in other fields. Students should be able to make use of the theories, methods and knowledge acquired in this course to identify and analyse problems that are posed in literary texts as well as to solve problems that emerge in the process of textual analysis. Students should also be able to demonstrate an awareness of the ethical codes of conduct, values and practices that guide researchers in the field of English literary study. This includes an awareness of the meaning and stakes of academic dishonesty.  One of the key objectives of this course is to equip students with the basic writing, reading and oral communication skills at the heart of critical and creative deliberation in literary studies. These outcomes will be achieved by way of carefully designed assignments to help students fine-tune these basic skills on a weekly basis both in class and in tutorial. By the end of this course, students should demonstrate the ability to formulate sound arguments in clear, grammatically accurate written and spoken language. In short, this course provides a rigorous introduction to the basics of reading, writing and critical textual analysis as these skills pertain specifically to the study of literary and other cultural texts.



ENGL 1624: Reading Literature, Film and Culture

Continuous Assessment (NQF level 6) - 16 credits

ENGL 1624 builds on the knowledge provided in ENGL 1514 but expands the range of texts analysed and methods used. Whereas the former course focuses specifically on texts, theories, terms and methods in the field of English literary studies, ENGL 1624 draws additionally on models of analysis developed in the fields of cultural studies and film studies.

Outcomes: After meticulous engagement with course materials and successful completion of this course, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of some of the key concepts, methods and theories used for analysing cultural texts such as novels, poems, plays, films, critical essays, cartoons, news reports and photographs. In addition to expanding their knowledge of the basic elements of literary representation, students will be given a broad introduction to the study of film (including the basic vocabulary of film studies; different theoretical approaches to film; and specific ways of grouping films [e.g. by genre, region, historical context, or authorship]) as well as some of the foundational critical concepts used in the field of cultural studies.   One of the key aims of this course is to provide rigorous training in a variety of skills fundamental to the analysis of literature and culture. Students will be given instruction on how to read closely for detail and nuance; how to identify patterns that cut across a range of representational forms; how to distinguish and evaluate critical perspectives; how to situate texts within their historical and ideological contexts; and how to weigh evidence and formulate arguments in grammatically accurate written and spoken language. Students will be offered frequent opportunity to practise their interpretative, analytical, reading, writing and oral communication skills both in the form of written assignments and participation in class and tutorial.



ENGL 2614: Early Modern to Contemporary World Literatures

Continuous Assessment (NQF level 6/7) - 16 credits

This course fosters a broad understanding of literatures written in English from the early modern era to the present using a variety of critical approaches. In any given year, the texts selected may be drawn from contexts such as early modern or contemporary Britain, the US, Africa, or other countries across the globe. ENGL 2614 builds on and expands the knowledge covered in ENGL 1514 and 1624 – students should have passed these to take ENGL 2614. Whereas ENGL 1514 and 1624 offered students an introduction to the basics of literary and cultural interpretation and analysis, this course will dwell in greater depth and detail on literary nuance and thematic meaning, as well as on historical periods, genres and movements. Students will be offered a more rigorous overview of the interpretative and theoretical tools that help readers make sense of literary representation in past and present contexts, and will be introduced to some of the major literary and theoretical movements that these texts emerge from. The course will place emphasis in particular on sharpening and further developing critical skills in reading, writing and oral communication.

Outcomes: Students who have successfully completed this course should have a sound understanding of some of major movements, authors and ideas in English literary history. Student should have developed a confident familiarity with some of the most influential theoretical frameworks for literary study to have emerged from specific historical periods and cultural contexts. In any given year, these frameworks might include, but are not limited to, feminism, post-colonialism, critical race theory, psychoanalysis and genre theory. Learners will have developed the ability to read a literary text as an articulation of not only a particular cultural and historical moment but also of a longer socio-cultural inheritance. By the end of this course, students should be able to produce carefully crafted and grammatically accurate written assignments that clearly demonstrate their aptitude for close textual analysis, historical contextualisation, language usage and persuasive argumentation.



ENGL 2724: Twentieth Century and Modernist Literatures

Continuous Assessment (NQF level 7) - 16 credits

This module builds on ENGL 2614 and focuses on a selection of literary texts and theories that have emerged in the fields of Twentieth Century and Modernist Literatures. The course will provide students with a firm understanding of the conceptual and theoretical concerns that influenced literary and cultural production from the early Twentieth Century to the present. We will strike a balance between the study of mainstream authors and of historically marginalised literary production during this time. Whereas ENGL 2614 offered a relatively broad overview of literatures written in English from the early modern era to the present, this course will be more focused in terms of the fields that it surveys and the historical and cultural contexts from which the literary and cultural texts under discussion emanate. Building on critical skills already developed in ENGL 1514, ENGL 1624 and ENGL 2614, students will be asked to engage in greater depth and detail with the areas of literary and critical theory that pertain to the texts under discussion than they did in previous modules. Careful attention will be paid to refining analytical, writing and oral communication skills.

Outcomes: On successful completion of the course, the student will be able to: recognise the value of multiple perspectives and develop competence in giving and receiving constructive criticism; demonstrate analytic and oral skills related to the interpretation of different literary theories and genres; demonstrate an understanding of the importance of the role of literature as a tool for social commentary as well as the role of criticism in deciphering cultural production and social change; identify the relationship between literature and its social context; demonstrate advanced writing and critical thinking skills.



ENGL 3718 and ENGL 3728:

Continuous Assessment (NQF level 7) - 32 credits each

SEE: Third-year Course Prospectus, 2018 



ENGS 1624 Critical Reading, Writing and Analyses of Texts

Continuous Assessment (NQF level 6) - 16 credits

ENGS 1624 offers essential preparation for students majoring in linguistics, and it is also relevant for those majoring in, for example, education, journalism, or cultural studies. It is offered as part of the undergradaute major in Linguistics that the Department of English presents in collaboration with the Department of Linguistics.

Outcomes: At the end of this module and after thorough engagement with the course material, students will be able to:

  • discuss and apply where appropriate key concepts such as phonetics and phonology; morphology and lexicology; semantics and pragmatics; grammatical parts; text and discourse;
  • discuss early language acquisition; psycholinguistics; history of English; sociolinguistics; world Englishes; stylistics; methodological paradigms; and language theories;
  • apply appropriate conventions in terms of intellectual property, copyright and plagiarism within all written and oral work presented; and
  • assess their own progress and take the necessary steps to ensure improvement within the structured academic environment of the initial years of study.

 



English Language courses, including courses offered in other programs


ENGS 1504 English: Language for Learning and Teaching

Continuous Assessment (NQF level 5) - 16 credits

ENGS1504 is a course aimed at developing the communicative competence of students for different professions. Attention will be devoted in particular to skills such as information management, dyadic communication, public speaking and presentation skills, and writing for professional purposes.

Outcomes:
At the end of the module and after thorough engagement with the course material, students should be able to:

  • understand a range of vocabulary and idiomatic expressions;
  • identify and understand the functions of discourse markers in texts;
  • use knowledge of grammatical constructions as a vehicle for accomplishing a variety of communicative tasks;
  • express opinions about a variety of issues fluently, critically and creatively;
  • address different audiences in spoken English with confidence and eloquence;
  • vary their style of writing according to readership and purpose of text;
  • evaluate their linguistic performance and accept responsibility for the continued development of their language skills;
  • work effectively with others as members of a team, group, organisation and community; and
  • demonstrate an understanding of the world as a set of related systems by recognising that problem-solving contexts do not exist in isolation.


ENGS 1608 English Skills

Continuous Assessment (NQF level 6) - 32 credits

ENGS 1608 is an English language development course for undergraduates.

Outcomes:
After participation in lectures and class activities and the successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

  • analyse key grammatical and lexical features of texts with high-frequency academic vocabulary;
  • understand key research terminology and the language features of research reports, literature reviews, and abstracts;
  • use English to express opinions, paraphrase, compare academic texts and summarise information;
  • display sufficient language proficiency to understand and produce spoken and written information in different formats and contexts; and
  • assess their own progress and take the necessary steps to ensure improvement within the structured academic environment of the initial years of study.

 



ENGE 1608 English Skills for Education

Continuous Assessment (NQF level 6) - 32 credits

ENGE 1608 is an English language development course for foundation and intermediate phase education students.

Outcomes:
After participation in lectures and class activities and the successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

  • analyse key grammatical and lexical features of texts;
  • use English to express opinions, paraphrase, compare academic texts and summarise information;
  • display sufficient language proficiency to understand and produce spoken and written information in different formats and contexts; and assess their own progress and take the necessary steps to ensure improvement within the structured academic environment of the initial years of study.


FACULTY CONTACT

T: +27 51 401 2240 or humanities@ufs.ac.za

Postgraduate:
Marizanne Cloete: +27 51 401 2592

Undergraduate:
Katlego Mabulana: +27 51 401 2495
Juanita Hlongwane: +27 51 401 3269

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