FREE STATE CENTRE FOR HUMAN RIGHTS: PERSPECTIVE SERIES

THINK LOCALLY AND ACT GLOBALLY: UNDERSTANDING THE PROMISE OF FORTY YEARS OF THE AFRICAN CHARTER

Contextual framework:
Africa charts her development path in Agenda 2063, deemed the blueprint and master plan for transforming Africa into the global powerhouse of the future. Agenda 2063 is a strategic, long-term planning instrument for the development of Africa in the next 50 years, prepared by the African Union Commission during the celebration of the OAU/AU golden jubilee in 2013. This innovative vision is based on the idea of people-driven development, in line with the Pan African Vision of 'an integrated, prosperous and peaceful Africa'. Agenda 2063 attempts to design a relevant framework for addressing past injustices and realisation of the 21st century as the African Century. The Agenda recognises that Africa needs a paradigm shift if current hopes for a better future are to be realised. However, concerns have been raised about whether Agenda 2063 is business as usual. Despite great vision, the Agenda is not clear on how to tackle a number of challenges. For example, Africa remains one of the poorest continents in the world with one-third of its population undernourished and millions with no access to clean water, electricity, education, healthcare and infrastructure. How to resolve poor leadership, corruption, dictatorship, conflict, unemployment, gross violations of human rights? Within this context, 50 years might be a long way to go. The point is, can the people of Africa afford this long wait? Given the short life expectancy on the continent, who and how many exactly will still be around and fit enough to account? Can Agenda 2063 be re-imagined? Otherwise, after 50 years, Agenda 2063 could well be added to the pile of projects and strategic documents yet to be implemented.

Panellists

  1. Prof Vincent O. Nmehielle, African Development Bank Group , Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire
    Prof Vincent Nmehielle is currently the Secretary General of the African Development Bank Group in Abidjan; former Bram Fischer Chair in Human Rights Law and former Professor of Law and Head of the Programme on Law, Justice and Development in Africa at the University of the Witwatersrand School of Law. Prof Nmehielle has written extensively on human rights, governance, accountability and development in  Africa
  2. Dr Yusra Suedi,  Global Studies Institute, University of Geneva
    Dr Yusra Suedi is a researcher in public international and has worked at the International Court of Justice, the United Nations International Law Commission and the International Labour Organisation  Administrative Tribunal. Her current research focuses on public interest litigation in international law.  She will soon be joining the London School of Economics  and Political Science as a Postdoctoral Fellow in Law.

Objectives

  1. To reassess the promises of Agenda 2063;
  2. To share insights into the Africa development project;
  3. To explore alternatives to speed up the  development of the continent;
  4. To reflect on  Africa’s new paradigm shift;
  5. To reflect on the pan African project of integration and renaissance;
  6. To promote human rights, good governance, responsible and innovative leadership on the  continent.

Date: Tuesday 27 July 2021
Time:
14:00-15:50
RSVP:
On or before 26 July 2021 to MokoenaM6@ufs.ac.za


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